music festival

I recently posted about how I got into reselling concert and theater tickets on StubHub. While StubHub is my primary venue for reselling tickets, I’ve recently started listing on Ticketmaster as well. Ticketmaster resale is not an option for all tickets, but when it is available, I tend to favor it over StubHub. Here’s what I’ve learned about reselling tickets on Ticketmaster and why it’s sometimes better to list them on Ticketmaster instead of StubHub.

What You Need to Know About Selling Tickets on Ticketmaster

Ticketmaster Fan-to-Fan resale is only available for certain events. If you’re tickets are eligible for resale, you’ll see this button on your order.

ticketmaster sell tickets button

If you purchased tickets through a third party site or over the phone with Ticketmaster, your order will not be eligible for resale.

Listing tickets for resale on Ticketmaster is super easy. StubHub makes it simple, but since Ticketmaster is the original source of the tickets, they’re able to make the process even easier. No uploading PDFs or mailing tickets required! Instead the buyer gets their electronic version of the tickets instantly from Ticketmaster even if you bought hard stock tickets.

One thing I’ve noticed when listing tickets is that the price Ticketmaster says you paid is actually lower than what you really paid for the entire order. This is because they leave out the order processing fee and only show the ticket subtotal.

Selling tickets on Ticketmaster
Ticketmaster says I paid $150.27 per ticket. Factoring in the processing fee, it’s really $153.72.

The ordering processing fee is less than $10 but it’s important to factor it in to ensure you won’t lose any money on the tickets.

It’s also important to note that some events will not let you sell the ticket below face value. This can be bad if you’re trying to get rid of tickets right before a show and you want to recoup at least some of what you spent. In this case, it’s best to head over to StubHub and list for whatever price you’d like.

When listing tickets, it’s easy to select which tickets from the order you want to sell. If you are selling two tickets, they’re guaranteed to be sold as a pair. For other combinations, here are the options Ticketmaster presents to buyers:

3 tickets – sold as 1 or 3
4 tickets – sold as 2 or 4
5 tickets – sold as 1, 2, 3, or 5
6 tickets – sold as 2, 4, or 6
7 tickets – sold as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 7
8 tickets – sold as 2, 4, 6, or 8

When listing tickets, Ticketmaster shows you the price the buyer will see and the amount you will be paid if your tickets sell. The fee works out to about 14% of the sale price. This fee can vary based on your listing price. While higher than Stubhub’s 10% fee, Ticketmaster has some benefits over StubHub which I will describe below.

Why You Might Want to Choose Ticketmaster Over StubHub

The main reason I choose Ticketmaster over StubHub is because it can help you get around precautions by the venue that make reselling on StubHub difficult. First off, Ticketmaster resale will help you get around lengthy delivery delays. I bought tickets in January through Fan-to-Fan resale and received them instantly despite there being a delivery delay until June (the event is in August).

When you’re a seller, getting around a delivery delay can be really useful. I bought Hamilton Chicago tickets for a show almost a full year later. Since there is a delivery delay until 45 days before the show date, if I were to sell on StubHub, I wouldn’t be able to fulfill the order and get paid for almost a year!

Sometimes, StubHub only allows hard stock ticket sales. This generally happens for big events like Hamilton that aren’t distributing PDF tickets but rather mobile only tickets. Since there’s no way to transfer these tickets to a StubHub buyer, you’re out of luck for reselling on StubHub. While StubHub has no way of transferring the tickets, Ticketmaster sure does!

ticketmaster mobile tickets
If tickets are mobile only, you can’t sell on StubHub. Luckily, selling on Ticketmaster was an option.

I also like using Ticketmaster Fan-to-Fan resale as a way to quickly flip tickets. For shows that will likely sell out quickly, if you purchase tickets through a presale or are able to snag a pair in the general onsale, fans who missed out on tickets will be eager to buy your resale tickets. The resale option doesn’t become available until the general onsale begins, but if you list your presale tickets ASAP, buyers will start seeing the option for resale tickets once the regular tickets are sold out. A person who missed out on tickets but still wants to see the show will likely buy the resale tickets, especially since Ticketmaster puts them right in their face. Some people may head over to StubHub, but it’s certainly easier to grab a pair through Ticketmaster resale.

A Word of Caution About Listing Tickets on Both Sites
StubHub deactivate option
You can easily activate/deactivate a StubHub listing if you choose to list on Ticketmaster.

Sometimes you’ll end up with tickets that aren’t selling well. It can be tempting to list your tickets on both StubHub and Ticketmaster. This is generally a bad idea since you run the risk of double selling the tickets. I’m not sure exactly what happens if you double sell your tickets, but you will likely face fees and possible suspension from both Ticketmaster and StubHub. Never start off by listing tickets on both sites since you aren’t sure how quickly they may sell. If you have some tickets that have been sitting around for a while, list them on both sites ONLY if you will always have access to your cell phone or a computer. Imagine going to a movie and leaving the theater to find two emails, one from StubHub and one from Ticketmaster, saying your tickets sold. No bueno. It’s up to you to decide if you want to take this risk, but it can be easy to forget they’re on both sites and can cause a lot of problems down the line.

Final Thoughts

While only available for certain events, Ticketmaster resale is an important option for reselling tickets. Not only does Ticketmaster make it easy to list tickets, some buyers may trust the Ticketmaster name over sites like StubHub. Ticketmaster resale has come in handy for me in a few situations like circumventing a Hamilton delivery delay. While I primarily sell on StubHub, I almost always choose Ticketmaster when the option is available.

Check out these articles for more information:

6 thoughts on “Adventures in Reselling: Tickets on Ticketmaster”

  1. Ticketmaster resale is BS. They set a minimum price so you can’t undersell their prices. No free market at work here, I guess. If I want to sell my tickets for less than I paid, I lose money not TM. I think they’re looking at yet another class action in the very near future.

  2. Will the sell ticket option be off on ticketmaster during the presale? wondering if I will be able to sell them during the general public sale?

    1. The resell option is off during presale and becomes available during the general onsale. However not all events participate in Ticketmaster resale so it is not guaranteed you will be able to resell them on Ticketmaster.

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